2012, 2013, 2014 Honda Civic 1.8L AEM Air Intake Installation

2012, 2013, 2014 Honda Civic 1.8L AEM Air Intake Installation


AEM 21-714C and 21-714P air intake systems
are engineered to add horsepower and reduce restriction compared to OEM air intakes and
it comes with a lifetime limited warranty. AEM intakes utilize a reusable DryFlow air
filter. These oil-free filters are durable and are very easy to clean. AEM 21-714C and 21-714P air intakes fit 2012
and 2013 Honda Civic models with a 1.8 liter engine. See the AEM catalog or AEMintakes.com
for complete model list and details. These air intake systems are not legal for highway
use in California or other states adopting California emission standards. Check AEMintakes.com
for up-to-date information on emissions legality for specific parts on specific vehicles. AEM power testing showed an estimated power
gain of 4 horsepower at 3600 RPM with this air intake installed on a 2012 Honda Civic
DX with a 1.8 liter engine. Actual results will vary depending on the condition of the
vehicle, mileage, weather and other variables. Here’s a comparison of the car’s sound
on the dyno with the stock OEM system verses AEM’s air intake.
AEM air intakes come with detailed instructions with pictures and diagrams. AEM intakes are
engineered for specific vehicles to product a safe horsepower increase. Make sure vehicle is parked on level surface. Set parking brake. If engine has run in the past two hours, let
it cool down. Disconnect negative battery terminal. Raise the front of the vehicle with a jack.
Refer to your owner’s manual for proper jack and jack stand placement to properly
support vehicle. Support your vehicle using properly rated jack stands before wheel removal
or while working under the vehicle. Remove the driver side wheel. Do not discard stock components after removal
of the factory system. Remove the front bolt securing the factory
air box. Remove the right bolt securing the factory
air box. Disconnect the air duct from the front of
the factory air box. Pull the air duct out of the vehicle’s engine
compartment. Loosen the hose clamp at the air box. Pull up firmly to dislodge the air box from
the mounting grommets, and then pull it forward. Disconnect the mass air flow sensor. Release the mass air sensor clip on the air
box. Remove the air box from the vehicle’s engine
compartment. Remove the back two bolts securing the air
box bracket. Remove the front top bracket bolt. Remove the lower bracket bolt. Remove the upper ECU bolt. Move the ECU to gain access to the remaining
bracket bolt. Remove bolt. Remove the bracket. Release the wire harness clip from the bracket. Reinstall the bracket back into the engine
compartment, moving the wire harness on top of the bracket. Release the clip on the PCV pipe and remove
the pipe from the intake tube. Release the clip on the valve cover for the
PCV hose, then remove the hose from the valve cover. Loosen the hose clamp at the throttle body. Remove the stock intake tube from the vehicle’s
engine compartment. Remove the two plastic clips securing the
side splash shield. Remove the three plastic clips securing the
fender liner. Remove the two plastic clips securing the
fender liner. Move the fender liner aside to gain access
to the fender well. Remove the upper bolt securing the resonator
tube. Remove the lower bolt securing the resonator
tube. Remove the resonator tube. Remove the mass air sensor from the air box. Release the clip on the thermostat housing
hose and move upward. Remove the coolant hose from the thermostat
housing. Release the clip on the throttle body hose
and move Remove the coolant hose from the throttle
body upward. When installing the intake system, do not
completely tighten the hose clamps or mounting hardware until instructed to do so. Install the provided coolant hose and clamps
onto the engine inlet and the throttle body inlet. Tighten the hose clamp on the engine inlet. Tighten the hose clamp on the throttle body
inlet. Install the mass air sensor into the upper
intake tube. Install the coupler and two hose clamps onto
the throttle body. Tighten the hose clamp on the throttle body. Install the coupler and two hose clamps onto
the upper intake tube. Tighten the hose clamp on the upper intake
tube. Install the intake tube into the throttle
body, but do not tighten the hose clamp. Install the rubber mount with washer and nut. Install the lower intake tube. Align the upper and lower intake tubes, but
do not tighten the hose clamp. Install the AEM Air Filter onto the lower
intake tube and tighten the hose clamp. Align and adjust the upper intake tube for
clearance, then tighten the hose clamp on the throttle body. Tighten the hose clamp on the lower intake
tube. Tighten the nut on the lower intake tube mount. Install the OEM PCV clip onto the hose. Install the PCV hose with the OEM clip onto
the intake tube. Install the PCV hose onto the valve cover. Reconnect the mass air sensor. Stock air box
system installed. AEM intake system installed. Be sure to replenish the coolant that was
drained during installation. Be sure to purge the coolant system before driving the vehicle.
For any additional details regarding this procedure refer to the factory service manual. Position the inlet pipes for the best fitment.
Be sure that the pipes or any other components do not contact any part of the vehicle. Tighten
any rubber mounts, all bolts, and hose clamps. With the engine turned off, have a friend
run the shift lever through the gears, and ensure that the counter weight for the shift
rod does not contact the intake pipe. If the shifter rod makes contact with the pipe, DO
NOT drive the vehicle until this has been corrected by re-adjusting the pipe so it does
not make contact. Install the driver side wheel using the factory
torque specification in the owner’s manual. Check for proper hood clearance. Re-adjust
pipes if necessary and re-tighten them. Inspect the engine bay for any loose tools
and check that all fasteners that were moved or removed are properly tightened. Reconnect the negative battery terminal and
start the engine. Let the vehicle idle for 3 minutes. Perform a final inspection before
driving the vehicle. It will be necessary to check AEM air intakes
periodically for realignment, clearance and tightening of all connections. Failure to
follow the above instructions or proper maintenance may void warranty. Go to AEMintakes.com to find products, download
installation instructions, view dyno charts showing estimated horsepower gains, and for
other product details.

24 comments

  1. Is worth it for those few horsepower that let the engine suck in more dust? may get even water moreover from below…

  2. when is the short ram intake going to be available for the 2014 honda civic si? i say that this should of been your guys first product to be released since AEM is a very popular to the Civic Si Generation.

  3. K&N is way easier to install, but it is not dry filter… The AEM has a gain of 4 HP, while the K&N is 3.14 HP… At this point, it is just matter of simple choice… I dont know how notable that difference of 0.86 HP will be…
    Also, if you live in a region where lot of rain and moderate floods are common, I dont think this CAI would be a good option, as this one does not accepts bypass valve. In my case, I prefer the Short Ram System from K&N… I wish AEM had an SRS option for the 2015 Civic.

  4. can this set up be used on the 2006 Honda Civic 1.8 (FD1)? From the video seems that the placement is similar to the FD1

  5. does anyone know if you have to take off the fender liner or you put it back on once the filter and the lower intake tube is installed.

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